Thursday, May 2, 2013

1915 Ford Model T by Christina Rich

Last month I told you I was saving my favorite car for last, and so I have. I'm super excited to introduce you to the 1915 Ford Model T.

 One of the reasons I love this car so much is because of the excitement surrounding it. Obviously these folks aren't quite old enough  to have been around when this car came off the production line, but it didn't stop their enthusiasm. And let me tell you, it was contagious. It was because of them that I went back and started taking pictures of some of the minor details on the other cars.

I just loved this lady with the hat. She was full of giddiness and smiles. It was like her first time sitting in a car. It wasn't hard to imagine a younger version back in the early 1900s preparing for a nice, quiet drive in the country with her beau.




You should have seen her when she pushed the horn. She jumped back and giggled like a school girl as its unique ahoogah cry echoed through the mall.

According to one of the forums I came across, the 1915 Model T did not come out of the factory with this particular horn. However, this horn, also known as the Hand-Klaxon is period correct, although from most of the pictures I've come across, the actual horn part was brass in color and not the black you see in my photo.



 Aren't these cool? I asked the owner if the goggles were for effect. Turns out he had to drive his car with the top down and it was just too cold that morning to drive without his eyes unprotected.

Still, I think they added the perfect touch.








I don't know why, but I find these outer compartments fascinating. I kind of wish my SUV had one so the tools wouldn't clutter up the back. The black box might not be too appealing to the eye, but I think it gives the car character. It screams luxury and practicality all at the same time.








Have you ever seen a key to one of these cars? I hadn't. For some reason I imagined them to be a cross between our modern keys and those old skeleton keys you see pictured with antique locks. Boy was I wrong.
 
When I saw the owner pull it out of his pocket I knew I had to take a picture. It kind of looks like something my grandma had used to wind up an old music box she had.  And what's cool, this key would start other cars, too.
And now for my favorite part of this vehicle. Isn't that cool?

These side lamps were lit with kerosene.



As were the tail lamps.It would have been nice to see this one lit too, but there is enough here to make the rest up in my imagination.


Now for something even cooler. According to the owner of this vehicle, the 1915 was the first model that came with the kerosene side lamps as well as the brass-rimmed electric headlights. Prior to this year, all headlights, or head lamps were powered by an Acetylene Generator on the running board and fueled by Acetylene Gas. Like the side lamps, the driver would have to light the gas, which sounds kind of dangerous to me.





Well, that ends my tour of some of the 20th century's early motorized vehicles. I hope, if you hadn't already, you came away with a bit of appreciation for these antiques that are such a huge part of history.


Born and raised in Kansas, where she currently lives with her husband and children, Christina loves to read stories with happily ever afters, research,  take photos, knit scarves, dig into her ancestry, fish, visit the ocean, write stories with happily ever afters and talk about her family and Jesus.
A semi-finalist in the Genesis, she just recently signed two contracts with Love Inspired Historical for a Biblical romance. You can find her at http://christinarich.wordpress.com/








21 comments:

  1. I just love looking at old model cars. There are some really neat ones and that's what this one is. I do believe they were all made better than now days. They were built to last, and, did. Maxie Anderson
    mac262(at)me(dot0com

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    1. Maxie, I think you are right. I think they built most things better back then.

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  2. Yay! I was looking forward to your post! And I wasn't disappointed. I love these old cars, they are gorgeous! Thank you so much for sharing, Christina. You know, if that black box was painted the same color as the car, it would have looked better. And you're right, the goggles fit right in. For some reason, I am picturing Dick Van Dyke in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. LOL

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    1. Ohhhhhh, I loved Chitty Chitty Bang Band. Hubs and I were just talking about the Apple Dumpling Gang. I'm going to have to see if I can find some of these older movies for a nice relaxing weekend.

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  3. what beautiful detail. I'll bet the motor has a distinct purr. Mmm, and I can just smell the polish and wax and slight aroma of oil. Thanks for taking us on a tour of a rare beauty.

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    1. There was a definite kerosene smell. ;)

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  4. Christina, you outdo yourself on these posts. They are so interesting. The key blew me away! I thought the same thing when I saw it. It looks like a key to a clock. Wow! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I figured there might be some writers out there that would have just though a key was a key. I know I probably wouldn't have thought about researching that small detail.

      You are welcome!

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  5. Christine,

    My dad loved old cars and trucks. One of his first cars was a Model A (or maybe Model T) with a rumble seat. He had a 1954 Ford truck, which he had remodeled. It a cool truck.

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    1. I think it would be a neat hobby, if it wasn't so expensive. One of my dad's uncles collected Model Ts. He let my cousin use them for her wedding party. It was really neat.

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  6. Wow, that lighting of the gas sounds scary! Love the key picture - never what I would have thought! Thanks for an interesting post. :)
    Susan P

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    1. Susan, I thought the lighting of the gas sounded scary too. I wonder if there were any accidents. We just don't see these sorts of details in the movies, do we?

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  7. While the workmanship and details of old cars are fascinating, I do think that I'm thankful for headlights that just turn on with a switch! Having to pull off the road in order to light your headlights would not work too well in this day and age!
    Just last week I saw an antique car of this same era at the grocery store. I don't know what model it was, but I thought it looked kind of odd to see a handicap tag hanging from the rearview mirror! It seemed so out of place! Still, it was very neat to see the car, and if a lady had not have been sitting in it, I might have walked past to take a closer look!

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    1. Oh, I think I would have walked right up to her and asked her about the car, especially with the handicap tag. :) You never know the driver could have been the original owner.

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    2. Oh, you are so much more bold than I am! :D

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  8. I love old cars too - I think of "the Happiest Millionaire' Movie that has a song about Detroit...but great post and fun to see how it used to be. truckredford(at)gmail(dot)Com

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  9. Eliza, I've never heard of that movie. I'll have to check it out. Thank you for stopping by.

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  10. I love old cars, too. I had so much fun researching cars for my novel set in 1907. Found some beautiful ones. I saw a key like that down in Florida at an antique car show several years ago. Didn't know what it was, but guessed it had something to do with the car. Just glad we don't have to get out and light those headlamps any more. Electricity, batteries, and computers sure make a difference.

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  11. Sounds so cool - would like to be able to ride in one of these old cars :)

    bettimace(at)gmail(dot)com

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  12. Christina, what a beautiful old car! Thanks for all the interesting details!
    Blessings, Laurie Kingery

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  13. So interesting, Christina. Enjoyed this. That car is beautiful.

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