Thursday, November 14, 2013

GREAT SONGS OF WORLD WAR II


Anne Greene
here. I’ve written about what Scottish men wore under their kilts, and what happened to their kilts. I told you that you would find more spectacular information about what changed the Scottish Highlanders and their way of life in my book Masquerade Marriage.
 
And the story continues in my long awaited book, Marriage By Arrangement, which releases on the 6th of next month, December 6, 2013.
 
This 14th day of November, I’m writing once again about events during World War II.
 
During World War II the American people kept their spirits and hopes high with the many new songs that blossomed during the first dark years of the war when America was losing the battle to Hitler’s Germany and Japan’s Hirohito.
 
World War II was the first conflict to take place in the age when almost ninety percent of American households had radio. Never before had it been possible for songs to be so widely distributed to the population. Never before had the number of listeners been so high.


 And overseas, American troops had regular access to radio in all but the most difficult combat situations. American troops listened to popular music on Armed Forces Radio between bouts of combat.
 
The song, They’re Either Too Young or Too Old took a light-hearted look at the men left for the women on the home front while American Troops were off fighting the war.
 
Popular songs like Sentimental Journey, I’ll be Seeing You, Moonlight Serenade, and I’ll be Home for Christmas, all spoke of women’s longings for loved ones overseas and the troops yearning to be home. Those songs gave society’s blessing that it was okay to miss your man because he fought for the good of Americans everywhere. And the many patriotic songs brought smiles to faces and pride to the hearts of Americans on the home front and abroad.
 
Earlier in the century big band music had grown wildly popular and still was in the 1940s. Some of the more popular war songs were:
 
There’ll Be Bluebirds Over The White Cliffs of Dover by Jimmy Dorsey & His Orchestra.
Be Careful It’s My Heart by Irving Berlin. 1942
Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy by the Andrews Sisters 1941
Comin’ In On A Wing and A Prayer by The Song Spinners
Don’t Get Around Much Anymore by Duke Ellington & His Orchestra
Don’t Sit Under The Apple Tree With Anyone Else But Me by 1942 by Stept, Brown, and Tobias.
Every Time We Say Goodbye by Cole Porter 1944
GI Jive by Johnny Mercer
I Don’t Want To Walk Without You by Harry James& His Orchestra 1942
I’ll Be Seeing You by Bing Crosby
It’s Been A Long Long Time by Harry James
I’ll Get By As Long As I Have You by Harry James& His Orchestra
Kiss The Boys Goodbye by Frank Loesser 1941
Praise The Lord and Pass The Ammunition by Frank Loesser 1942
 
People in the USA held the same desires as their leaders, and the government counted on popular music to reflect the same war aims that Franklin Delano Roosevelt wanted. Everyone hoped for a quick final victory over the Axis, and the songs about a world after the war with the boys coming home met those wishes.
 
This unity gave the USA an enormous energy that allowed the nation to accomplish far more, at less human cost, than the other major powers in the war. So during the dark years of the war where almost every citizen lost a loved one, music kept spirits high. 
 
Have you heard any of these popular songs, and if so, which is your favorite? 
 
Leave a comment and one lucky winner will win my book, A Texas Christmas Mystery. Please leave your email address so I can contact you for your address.

 
ANNE GREENE delights in writing about wounded heroes and gutsy heroines. Her second novel, a Scottish historical, Masquerade Marriage, won the New England Reader Choice award, the Laurel Wreath Award, and the Heart of Excellence Award. The sequel Marriage By Arrangement releases December 6, 2013. A Texas Christmas Mystery also won awards. Anne makes her home in McKinney, Texas. She graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor’s degree in Literary Studies from the University of Texas. Tim LaHaye led her to the Lord when she was twenty-one, and Chuck Swindoll is her Pastor. View Anne’s other books, her blog, travel pictures, and art work at http://www.AnneGreeneAuthor.com. Her highest hope is that her stories transport the reader to an awesome new world and touch hearts to seek a deeper spiritual relationship with the Lord Jesus.
 
Join Anne for excellent writing tips on her blog,
 
 
Don’t forget to leave a comment. Anne loves to talk with her fans.

 

45 comments:

  1. I love the songs that were popular during war times. I can just see people gathered around the radio listening. For a brief moment, people could forget what was going around them and enjoy their music.

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

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    1. Melanie, I so agree with you. It was far more intimate than watching TV together because people could sing together and look into one another's face. Good to visit with you here, Melanie!

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  2. Music has always been a huge part of my life. I love older music, especially from the 40's-60's. It's a shame music isn't as clean as it used to be. Thanks for a great post, Anne! (I've always wondered about the history behind the Scottish kilts and what the men wore under them! I must have missed those post when I was in the hospital and/or recovering from my surgeries, darn it!)
    kam110476 (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Hi Kam, the post about the kilts is called Going Commando. It is in the achieves and easy to find. I too wish we had better lyrics and music. So much today is cacophonous. Good to see you here.

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  3. I absolutely love the songs of this era! Such amazing talent and fun! I recently read Sarah Sundin's novels which are set during WWII and mention several songs. So I made grooveshark playlists for each of the books of all the songs mentioned in each one and would listen to them while reading the book. It really helped to get my mind set in that time! This post put me in the mood to listen to this kind of music so I just put one of the playlists on! I've heard several of the songs you mentioned and I really enjoyed Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree With Anyone Else But Me(listening to it now!), Their Either too Young or too Old, Moonlight Serenade, Be Careful it's My Heart, Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, and Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition (which gets stuck in my head whenever anyone says Praise the Lord).
    Thanks for a fun post!
    gatorade635(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. HI Abbi, you're the kind of reader all writers love!! So nice to see you here. I'm so glad you're enjoying that wonderful music!

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  4. I love these books that take place in WW ll. It hits home for my family. My oldest brother was in that war and was a Medic, who had to go out on the field to tend wounded. Also had two brother-in -laws that served in that one too. One had pictures of him with Hitler's sister, when our troops had taken over their house for use. He said she and her Mother were very nice. I also had cousins, and uncle, and many friends that served then too. I was just a young girl of 7 when it started and soon we moved to Houston, TX. so my dad could work in the shipyard as a welder. Women did their part to help every way they could. I liked the way our people worked together for the good of our country, unlike now-days. I remember all of these songs and were for many, many years. I still love them.
    Have records of many of them. I would love to win this book from a good 'ole Texas author. I have traveled through McKinney many times. Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

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    1. Ah, you're only a couple years older than I am. I grew up on those songs and every time I hear the song or even the title, I'm taken back to a time and place that was so different. America was strong and respected. Her flag few high, and everyone did their part to help in the war effort. My father had a disability that kept him out of the war, but his brothers and my mother's cousins served. One came back with part of his leg missing and another came home with an English war bride.

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    2. Hi Maxie, I love your post. You remember the war even though you were quite small. You had relatives who served and no doubt told you their stories. Thanks so much for sharing here.

      Hi Martha, good to see you again!!! I'm so glad your family members who served returned! So many, many, very young men didn't. Eighteen was the draft age. Right out of high school. So sad. But you're right, American was strong, proud, and respected. We are so far from that now. And that's tragic.

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  5. I remember many of theses songs from all the old movies I have watched over the years. The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy is probably one of my favorites only because it has been song at many events focusing on WWII. During my high school years when lip syncing was popular three gals in my class did this number dressed in borrowed boy scout uniforms.
    Cindy Huff
    cindyshuff at comcast dot net

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    1. Oh Cindy, that must have been a hoot to see those girls. It's a great memory for you. Thanks for sharing. It's good to see you here.

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  6. Anne, thanks for bringing back so many good memories through these songs. Bing Crosby, the Andrews Sisters, Jo Stafford, Glenn Miller, and Tommy Dorsey and so many others made the music come alive. The horrible memories of what happened "over there" were tempered with the music we listened to. Our country should never forget those years and the ones since when our men and women sacrificed everything to keep us free. Great post for this time of remembrance for those who served.

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    1. Thanks again, Martha! Our church is having a big band concert next February. I wouldn't miss it for anything. This generation will remember, but I wonder about the one that follows us. We need to keep writing these books.

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  7. Such an interesting article. I am old enough I remember my parents and grandparents and aunts playing this music. The old movies from 50;s certainly played it as did the radio. I remember Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy and Don't Sit Under The Apple Tree With Anyone Else But Me more than some of the others.
    It was an interesting time in history my dad and several uncles served so I appreciate the article Thank You
    mcnuttjem0(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hi Jackie, My Uncle also served. My Dad was too young. Don't Sit Under The Apple Tree With Anyone Else But Me was my mother's favorite song to dance to. Lovely memories. Thanks for visiting.

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  8. Hi, it's me again. I forgot to say that "I'll be Seeing You" was one of my favorites and still is even though it brings tears to my eyes every time I hear it. For singing and having fun, I loved "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy". "White Cliffs of Dover" was another favorite.

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    1. You're so sweet, Martha. I hope you have CDs of those songs, or at least some old records. Yep the songs bring tears!

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  9. Music certainly does help keep spirits high! I enjoy "I’ll Get By As Long As I Have You" and "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy". Thank you for sharing these special songs!

    texaggs2000 at gmail dot com

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    1. Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy seems to be a favorite. I think jitterbugging to that would be lots of fun! They knew how to dance in those days. I think they knew how to have more fun as well. They didn't use drugs to dull their minds. Okay off my platform. Anyway it would have been a good time to be a teen I think. That is if the teen lived somewhere near where the "boys" service men were stationed.

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  10. Hi Anne, a few of the songs were familiar but best one I remember is sitting under the apple tree...how about the one Dinah is in the kitchen blowing on a horn, not sure when that one came out but is a oldie...thanks for your post today enjoyed reading your comments. I would love to read your book too, I have family in Tx....

    a reader fan in Ga
    Paula O(kyflo130@yahoo.com)

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    1. Hi Paula, thanks for coming to visit. That song with Dinah in the kitchen was a 1926 song and is part of I've Been Working On The Railroad. But I'm sure it was sung during the war years as well. I think we learned some of these in Elementary School. Fun to remember, isn't it?

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  11. There's still time to enter for a free Christmas book.

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  12. I collect Christmas books all year long to read around the holidays, but my list is shorter than usual this year. I would love to win your book. Thanks for the oppprtunity.

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    1. You are in the drawing. Thanks for visiting.

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  13. I love the music of that era! I'll Be Seeing You is my favorite. Great post, thanks.

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    1. Jodybooks@faithwriters.net

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    2. Hi Jody, I love I'll be Seeing You too. Good to see you here!

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  14. I love the music of that era! I'll Be Seeing You is my favorite. Great post, thanks.

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  15. I like Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree" and love the music of that time. I love to listen to oldies. Love to win and read your book Texas Christmas Mystery. sharon, CA wileygreen1(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Hi Sharon, you picked my mother's favorite. She loved to dance to it as well. Good to see you here.

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  16. Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy is the song I'm most familiar with. It's still a great song. I may have heard some of the other songs in old movies, but I don't remember them. Thanks for offering your book; it looks like one I'd enjoy reading.

    pmk56[at]sbcglobal[dot]net

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    1. Hi Pam, Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy is a favorite. It's the one I'm least familiar with. I love all the old songs.

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  17. Anne, I was old enough to remember what was going on. I was in 3rd and 4th grades when my brother and the others were serving. I remember when Mother cooked Sun. dinners and some of the soldiers and sailors ate with us. You see I had 4 older sisters who went to the USO.And the others wee from the small town we moved from to Houston. Glad I remember. I am 78 now. Maxie

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    1. Maxie, you lived during a vital, interesting time. I'm sure you see many changes take place over the years. Would you say they were good or bad for the most part?

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  18. My husband and a friend play and sing music in nursing and assisted living residences. It is amazing to see some of the residents almost come to life when they hear the music of "their day." Some of them still get up and dance and they ALL know the words.

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    1. The music we were young with is the best we'll ever hear. That's a wonderful ministry your husband has. He brings so much joy to people who are sometimes forgotten. Thank him for me.

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  19. I have heard all of those songs. I loved listening to the Andrew Sisters and have seen some of the black and white movies they made during the war. Enjoyed reading your comments. Weren't those old time radios large?
    JWIsley(at)aol(dot)com

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  20. Yep, the old time radios were quite large. And I think they had a good bit of static as well. But radio was new back then and a marvel. We've sure seen a lot of changes since those days. Thanks for visiting, Joye!

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  21. I'll be picking a winner out of my hat tomorrow. So keep watching.

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  22. Those songs were the ones I listened to as a pre-teen. I was very interested in war news and the music. I still know most of the songs.
    Sitting in my living room today is a big old Philco radio, very similar to the one you picture, purchased by a family member in 1935 and still in use in the 50s.
    Sylvia Gould nade@gorge.net

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    1. Hi Sylvia, I envy your having that radio! Wonderful! Aren't those songs wonderful. I love them all. So nice to talk with you here.

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  23. Enjoyed this post on music from the WWII era. My hubby transferred many of these songs his English parents listen to during the war to CD's from their vinyl records. We both enjoy the big band sound. I especially like I'll be Seeing You and There'll Be Blue Birds over the White Cliffs of Dover sung by Vera Lynn, the darling of the British people. Thank you for this lovely post.

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  24. Thank you, Pat, for visiting with me here. I hope you return each month. I think next month I'll be writing about the 1920s. That's the next book I'm writing. Hope you come back.

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  25. The winner of this month's blog is Cindy Shuff. Congratulations Cindy! I'll send you an email to get your address. Aren't you glad you visited?

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  26. I like 30s and 40s music ~ especially the refrains
    Kathleen ~ Lane Hill House

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