Tuesday, November 10, 2015

The Cherokee Strip Land Run & Book Giveaway!




I was born and raised in Oklahoma, and I’ve always been interested in the land runs--one aspect of our state’s unique history. In case you’re not familiar with Oklahoma, much of the state was designated as Indian Territory in the later half of the nineteenth century. Over forty Indian tribes were eventually moved there because white settlers in other states and territories wanted their valuable land.


Once much of the West had been settled, people started looking at Oklahoma as one of their last chances to get free land. They pressured the government to open the Unassigned Lands--land that had been promised to certain tribes, but no Indians had settled on it. The government finally agreed, and President Benjamin Harrison signed the paperwork for what was later called Harrison’s Hoss Race.

And they're off!


On April 22, 1889, over two million acres of land was opened for settlement in Oklahoma’s first land run. The homesteads were 160 acres with much smaller town lots also available. Anybody twenty-one and older could ride—women, foreigners, and blacks included. The race began with the blast of cannon and gunfire and a cheer so loud it made ears ache. An instant stampeded ensued. In less than a few hours, all of the homesteads had been claimed, leaving many people disillusioned and unhappy because they didn’t get one. In the first book in my series, Gabriel’s Atonement, my hero and heroine ride in the 1889 land run, which led to the settlement of Guthrie, Oklahoma City, and several other towns. 


Hopeful settlers waiting in line to register for the land run
Joline’s Redemption, which released on November 1st, is the second book in my Land Rush Dreams series. It features the Cherokee Outlet aka Cherokee Strip land run, which was held on September 16, 1893. More than 100,000 hopeful settlers raced for 42,000 claims. I’m sure you can imagine the chaos of such an event. Lucky winners settled in sod homes and dugouts carved from the prairie while others lived in their covered wagons. The first winters were harsh as the land tested the endurance and character of its new inhabitants. Many of the settlers could not endure the harsh conditions, and after weeks or months, gave up their dream. But for those who stayed, hard times gave way to better days as crops flourished and communities, schools and churches rose from the wind-swept plains.



In celebration of autumn and my new release, I'm giving away a copy of Hometown Harvest Cook Book. Just leave a comment with your email address to be entered.






Joline's Redemption is finally available!

Joline has fallen as far as any woman can. She once had lofty dreams of love and luxury, but she made a series of dreadful decisions, leaving her bereft of all hope. Jo has a long list of secrets to keep and has to continually look over her shoulder, as the man she’s running from may show up anywhere, anytime.


Bestselling author Vickie McDonough grew up wanting to marry a rancher, but instead married a computer geek who is scared of horses. She now lives out her dreams penning fictional romance stories about ranchers, cowboys, lawmen, and others living in the Old West. Vickie is an award-winning author of 38 published books and novellas. Her novels include the fun and feisty Texas Boardinghouse Brides series, and End of the Trail, which was the OWFI 2013 Best Fiction Novel winner. Whispers on the Prairie was a Romantic Times Recommended Inspirational Book for July 2013. Song of the Prairie won the 2015 Inspirational Readers Choice Award. Her latest series, Land Rush Dreams, focuses on the Oklahoma land runs.

22 comments:

  1. Thank you, Vickie, for this great post and giveaway! I always love coming here.

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

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    1. You're welcome! I'm glad you enjoyed the post.

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  2. Thank you for the giveaway.
    I enjoyed this because I grew up on the Texas-Oklahoma border and have lots of relatives in Oklahoma.
    My Grandmother was born in Ardmore.
    linderellar at yahoo dot com

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    1. Linda, I grew up in Northeastern OK, so we were almost neighbors. :)

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  3. Sound like a delicious cookbook!
    mmyheartishere@gmail.com

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    1. It looks like it has some good recipes. Good luck!

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  4. Reading about the history of Oklahoma from brochures and info I picked up at a Tourist Information Center when we stopped on our way from Houston to Tulsa is what gave me the idea for my very first series. Texas has a lot of wonderful, colorful, history, but I discovered Oklahoma has a great history as well. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. You're right, Martha. Both of our states have very unique history that's different from the other states. Let me know if you ever come this way again.

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    2. Since Mike and his family moved back to Tulsa and our granddaughter and her family live in Norman, we should be getting back that way next year.

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  5. Thank you for this giveaway. I love cookbooks. This story of the Oklahoma land rush looks like a great read. I love stories that incorporate history in them.
    susanmsj at msn dot com

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    1. Hi Susan, I enjoy reading novels with real life history too. I think you'll enjoy my land run stories--lots of excitement in them!

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  6. I love the Gooseberry Patch Cookbooks and this one definitely looks like one that I would like to add to my collection. Thanks for the giveaway.
    reneerachoyolsenATgmailDOTcom

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  7. I am fascinated by the land runs and really enjoy learning about this unique aspect of Oklahoma's history! Thank you for sharing a great post and great giveaway.

    texaggs2000 at gmail dot com

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    1. Me too! The land runs were such a unique way to settle the land.

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  8. Love the info about oklahoma. kamundsen44ATyahooDOTcom.

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  9. As I read this, I am both humbled and thankful. Humbled because I don't know if I could have endured all that they encountered and thankful for how easy my life has been!
    Thank you for this post and giveaway!
    Connie
    cps1950 (at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. I know what you mean, Connie. Life in the 19th century must have been difficult for many people.

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  10. Thanks Vickie for sharing this aspect of Oklahoma history with us. I love trying new recipes and this cookbook sounds great!
    marypopmom (at) yahoo (dot) com

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  11. You're welcome, MaryAnn! Good luck in the drawing!

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  12. Our family lived in Tulsa from the time I was twelve until my mid-twenties. Always in my heart! Kathleen ~ Lane Hill House lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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