Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Death of King George III...and a Giveaway



Queen Elizabeth II is the longest reigning monarch in British history, followed by Queen Victoria. The third longest reign was that of King George III, who reigned from sixty years, from 1760-1820, through the Seven Years War against France, the American War of Independence, the Napoleonic Wars against France, and through poor health and mental illness.
Full-length portrait in oils of a clean-shaven young George in eighteenth century dress: gold jacket and breeches, ermine cloak, powdered wig, white stockings, and buckled shoes.
King George III, 1765, by Allan Ramsay. Public Domain
In 1810, King George grew too ill to rule. Years before, he struggled with mental illness (some scholars believe he suffered from poryphoria), but now he was almost blind from cataracts and suffered from rheumatism. He also grieved the death of his youngest daughter, Princess Amelia. His oldest son, also named George, became the Regent in 1811, a role he held for the rest of King George's life, serving in his father's stead.

By the end of the year, King George was considered insane. He could not comprehend political events or the death of his wife in 1818. In early January of 1820, he could no longer walk and died at Windsor Castle on the 29th, six days after the death of his son, the Duke of Kent (father of the future Queen Victoria). 


Monochrome profile of elderly George with a long white beard
Engraving of King George III by Henry Meyer, 1816. Public Domain

The nation plunged into mourning, wearing black as a sign of respect while plans were made.

The King's Lying in State took place on February 15 at the Royal apartments at Windsor Castle, and the funeral followed the next evening at St. George's Chapel. Mourners accompanied the casket to the chapel for the service, walking in line according to precedence. (The Prince Regent did not attend, as he was gravely ill.) The casket was covered by a pall of purple velvet, carried under a purple velvet canopy by ten Yeomen of the Guard. Grenadiers of the Foot Guards walked alongside, and every fourth man held a torch.
Image result for the death of george iii
Funeral Procession of George III, 1820
A death bell was rung, and muffled drums sounded as they walked. At the chapel, the Dean of Windsor and other clergymen, as well as a choir, joined the group. The casket was placed on a platform. The choir sang "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth," and then the rest of the service was officiated by the Dean of Windsor and the Archbishop of Canterbury.

After the service, pallbearers lowered the casket into the Royal Vault under the chapel, where King George III lies today.

The Regent became King George IV, but when he died in 1830 without any surviving children, his brother William IV ruled. He, too, lacked surviving legitimate children, and the throne passed to the only legitimate child of their late brother, the Duke of Kent, a daughter named Alexandrina Victoria...known today as Queen Victoria.

***
A Mother For His Family (Love Inspired Historical) by [Dietze, Susanne]

The death of King George III is one of the historical events mentioned in my new Regency, A Mother for His Family (Love Inspired Historical). I'm giving away a copy to one person who leaves a comment (and a way to contact you!) to this post by 11:59 pm January 6, 2018, EST.

Paperback available to US only, please.


40 comments:

  1. What an interesting post. I imagine not having an heir preyed on King George IV's mind as well as William IV's. Interesting that the reason Queen Victoria took the throne was because of no heirs from the previous kings. Thank you for the history lesson. :)

    Blessings,
    Cindy W.
    countrybear52 AT yahoo DOT com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cindy! Yes, you're so right about how troubled many were by the lack of heirs. When George IV's daughter Princess Charlotte and her son died in childbirth, it was devastating, both personally to the family and to the country.

      Thank you so much for stopping by. You're entered into the drawing!

      Delete
  2. I enjoyed the post, most interesting. Thanks for the chance to win :)
    jslbrown2009 at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good morning, Lisa! Thank you for visiting! You're entered into the drawing!

      Delete
  3. Always informative! Thanks!
    bcrug(at)twc(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Connie! So glad you could stop by!

      You're entered into the drawing!

      Delete
  4. Sounds good. cheetahthecat1986ATgmailDOTcom.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you like the book, Kim! Have a great day.

      I've got you down for the giveaway!

      Delete
  5. A great history lesson about King George, his life and having no heirs to the throne when he died. His grief had to be overwhelming.
    A Mother for His Family sounds like a book I defnitely must read. I'm sad to see Love Inspired Historical to end with LI. Blessings to you as you continue to write great historical stories.
    marilynridgway78[at]gmail[dot]com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Marilyn! Thank you for the kind words. I, too, am so sad about LIH closing--not just as an author but as a fan and reader.

      I've got you down for the giveaway. Have a great day!

      Delete
  6. Thank you for the post. I didn't know most of this. Your book looks great. Thank you for the chance to win a copy.
    susanmsj at msn dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good morning, Susan! I didn't know much about George III's death, either, but it's interesting how the country mourned and what the funeral was like. St. George's, where it was held, is where Prince Harry and Megan Markle will be getting married!

      You're entered in the giveaway!

      Delete
  7. I really enjoyed this post and I was surprised to learn that the two monarchs with the longest reigns were both women.
    Blessings & Happy New Year!
    cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Connie! Isn't that fascinating that the two longest reigning monarchs are women?

      Happy New Year to you, too! You're in the drawing!

      Delete
  8. oh this is a most informative post. I did not realize the complete lineage. thanks for sharing this. I would like to read this book.
    quilting dash lady at Comcast dot net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good morning, Lori! The family tree for the royal family is pretty interesting. It's ironic to me that George III had so many children, and yet among his older sons, at least, the grandchildren died young or were not legitimate.

      I hope you enjoy the story! You're entered into the drawing.

      Delete
  9. I enjoyed reading about the years preceding the crowning of Victoria. Thanks for a chance to win your book!
    Mary Zan at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mary! It is truly interesting how Victoria became queen. George III had so many children, but the older son's children either died or were illegitimate. Victoria is such an icon that it's difficult to imagine Britain without her.

      You're entered into the contest!

      Delete
  10. Very interesting historical details. Thanks Suzanne :) We are thoroughly enjoying watching The Crown on Netflix, so this just adds to our learning. Thanks for the giveaway.
    bettimace at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Betti! Oh, The Crown is so good. Amazing acting, writing, and scenery! I also love the Victoria series on PBS. Can't wait for Season 2.

      You're in the drawing!

      Delete
  11. I enjoy learning little tidbits about history in just about any era. I am sure I learned alot of this in school, but that was so long ago and really didn't care about it then. Thanks for your giveaway.

    Judy (magnolias_1(at)msn(dot)com)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Judy! I love learning historical tidbits, too. There is always so much to learn!

      Thanks for stopping by. You're entered into the drawing!

      Delete
  12. My husband and I have been enjoying watching Victoria on PBS but I did find myself somewhat confused over where Victoria fell in the lineage. This cleared it up for me. Thanks for the interesting info and the giveaway Susanne. :)
    momrain(AT)aol(DOT)com

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Loraine! I sure enjoy watching Victoria, too. Glad the post could help!

    You're entered into the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I love history and this is one very interesting post. Thanks for sharing and having a giveaway. Good luck everyone!

    princessdebbie1_2000 at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Debbie! I'm so glad you enjoyed the post. You're entered into the drawing!

      Delete
  15. Thank you for sharing your interesting post. Happy New Year!

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy New Year to you, as well!

      I've got you down for the giveaway. Have a great day!

      Delete
  16. What a fascinating post. I love visiting this blog barbecue I am always learning something I didn't know. Thank you!

    Cnnamongirl at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I always learn something new, too! What a cool world we live in. :)

      I've got you down for the drawing! Blessings!

      Delete
  17. I always love reading and learning about the past. Thank you for sharing! jumpforjoy at gmail .com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Joy! I love learning about history, too. There's always something new!

      Love your email addy!

      You're entered into the drawing.

      Delete
  18. I always enjoy learning about history. Sounds like another great story!
    smincer10(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for coming by, Susanne! I hope you enjoy the book. I've got you down for the giveaway!

      Delete
  19. Loved the informative details about King George III. I also love when an author can put historical details in a book. I've read about A Mother for His Family and it's a book that I've very much enjoy reading. Thanks for the chance to win a copy!
    2clowns at arkansas dot net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the kind words, Kay! I appreciate that! I love adding historical details and events to stories whenever possible. This was such a major event and it changed the course of the characters' lives, so I had to include it!

      You're entered into the drawing.

      Delete
  20. This post gives a lot of information about King George III that I didn't know. It is very cool that you were able to put it into your book. Thanks for the chance to win a copy it sounds fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good afternoon, Debbie! I am so glad you could come by. You're entered into the drawing!

      Delete
  21. Thanks to all who came by and commented! I just popped the numbers into random dot org and the winner is... Lisa Brown! Congratulations, Lisa! I'll be in touch!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Congratulations on another Love Inspired Historical, Susie, as well as the blessing to the winner.

    I read your post last week when I was busy with mine, but forgot to come back and say how much I appreciate all your posts on both British and American history. Well done.

    ReplyDelete