Wednesday, May 15, 2019

MMMadness Party--Six Book Giveaways!





Welcome to  the Mid-Month Madness Party! We really appreciate you coming by! We will be giving away six books so be sure to pay attention to how to enter.

To enter to win you MUST leave a comment WITH your email and you MUST ask one or more of the authors a question you'd like to know about them, their writing, or their books.

We are looking forward to getting to know you better and hope you'll get to know us better, too!


BE SURE TO DROP BY THE FACEBOOK PARTY FOR A CHANCE TO MINGLE WITH THE AUTHORS, AND EVEN MORE GREAT GIVEAWAYS! 
IT'S TODAY, WED MAY 15, FROM 3:00 to 6:00 PM EASTERN TIME.



Bandolero




Yoana Armenta’s reckless behavior results in her being captured by bandoleros, Yoana fears her impulsive nature has caused irreparable disaster. Amado Castro gave a death bed promise that he intends to keep – at all costs - even if he must break a childhood vow. When his choice endangers Yoana’s life, he struggles with the decision to honor his word, or to protect Yoana, whom he has come to care for more than he could have imagined. Now as the bandoleros threaten to sell Yoana and her tΓ­a to a fate worse than death, and the rancheros want to hang Amado, they must make choices. Will they trust God, or will they do what seems right to them?




Cameo Courtships--A Novella Collection




 A Family Heirloom Inspires Romance
In 1851, a special cameo is gifted by Queen Victoria to Letitia Newton, who though considered an old maid, meets the perfect gentleman minutes after donning. Told by the Queen the cameo is to be shared, Letitia gifts the "Victoria Cameo" to a woman in her family, hoping adventure and romance will follow each of its subsequent wearers.
The collection includes: 

PINNED ABOVE HER HEART by Susanne Dietze
1851 – Pittsburgh, PA
TAMING PETRA by Jennifer Uhlarik
1875 – Colorado Territory
MEET ME AT THE FAIR by Kathleen Y’Barbo 
Spring 1885 – New Orleans during the 1884 World’s Fair and Cotton Exposition
LENDING MY HEART by Debra E. Marvin
1895 – Pittsburgh, PA




The Chaplain's Daughter


A feisty army laundress takes up her father's calling when a proud artillery captain finds his heart and hope shattered. Will her ministrations bring medicine to his soul or rub salt in his wounds?




The Daughter's Predicament
(Book 2 in the Quilting Circle series)


Can a patient love win her heart? 
As Isabelle Atwood’s romance prospects are turning in her favor, a family scandal derails her dreams. While making a quilt for her own hope chest, Isabelle’s half-sister becomes pregnant out of wedlock and Isabelle--always the unfavored daughter--becomes the family sacrifice to save face. Despite gaining the attention of a handsome rancher, her parents are pressuring her to marry a man of their choosing to rescue her sister’s reputation. A third suitor waits silently in the wings, hoping for his own chance at love.

Isabelle ends up with three marriage proposals, but this only further confuses her decision. A handsome rancher, a stranger, and an unseen suitor are all waiting for an answer. Isabelle loves her sister, but will she really allow herself to be manipulated into a marriage without love? Will Isabelle capitulate and marry the man her parents wish her to, or will she rebel and marry the man they don’t approve of? Or will the man leaving her secret love poems sweep her off her feet?





Julia


The War Between the States may have ended, but prejudice is still strong among the families journeying together on a wagon train headed down the Santa Fe Trail.
Julia Scott is traveling to New Mexico with her father and younger brother. Her pa fought for the North in the war where her two older brothers lost their lives. Pa is looking for a fresh start in a new place, but Julia just wants him to be happy again.
Taylor Marshall, a Southerner who fought for the Confederates, is on his way to Colorado to raise horses. He’s attracted to Julia, but her father adamantly forbids them to talk to one another.
Circumstances continually throw Julia and Taylor together, and their attraction grows. Will a forbidden romance bloom? Or will they go their separate ways when the trail splits?





Love's Kindling


During the American Revolution in 1779, Aurinda Whitney lives with her cold and calloused father, an embittered veteran of the previous war. Aurinda’s life changed forever when her father returned for her after that war, taking her away from the only place she’d ever experienced affection. Since her father blamed Aurinda for the death of his wife in childbirth, Aurinda is convinced she is unworthy of love. 
Zadok Wooding believes he is a failure as he tends the smithy at home while others go to battle against the British. Just when he has an opportunity to become a hero, he is blinded in an accident. Now he fears he will never live up to the Biblical “mighty man of valor” for whom he was named. 
When the couple meet, they are both challenged to overcome adversity as well as their inadequacies. Unexpected secrets of their past emerge that can change their lives forever. But can they look past their present circumstances to heal—and find love? 





In just a minute, you can qualify to win...



... by directing a comment at one or more of the authors! But first, please allow me to introduce them:


About Your Hostesses



Elaine Marie Cooper has two historical fiction books that recently released: War’s Respite (Prequel novella) and Love’s Kindling. Love’s Kindling is available in both e-book and paperback. They are the first two books in the Dawn of America Series set in Revolutionary War Connecticut. Cooper is the award-winning author of Fields of the Fatherless and Bethany’s Calendar. Her 2016 release (Saratoga Letters) was a finalist in Historical Romance in both the Selah Awards and Next Generation Indie Book Awards. She penned the three-book Deer Run Saga and has been published in numerous magazines and anthologies. You can visit her website/ blog at www.elainemariecooper.com



MARY DAVIS is a bestselling, award-winning novelist of over thirty titles in both historical and contemporary themes. She is the author of The Widow’s Plight (Book 1 in the Quilting Circle series), “Zola’s Cross-Country Adventure” in The MISSAdventure Brides Collection, “Holly & Ivy” in A Bouquet of Brides Collection, The Prodigal Daughters series from Love Inspired, and Newlywed Games. Coming in 2019, The Daughter’s Predicament (Book 2 in the Quilting Circle series) and “Bygones” in Thimbles and Threads. She’s a member of ACFW and active in critique groups. Mary lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband of over thirty-four years and two cats. She has three adult children and two incredibly adorable grandchildren.






Best-selling author Nancy J. Farrier loves to write about characters who live in the western United States. She lives in the Sonoran Desert in Southern Arizona. She loves the rich history of the Southwest and Western States. When she isn’t writing, Nancy loves spending time with her family and rescue cats and dogs, riding her bicycle, hiking, reading, doing needlecraft. 




Historical romance  Where every underdog has his day.
Kathleen L. Maher’s first crush was Peter Rabbit, and she’s loved conflicted heroes ever since. She has two novellas in BARBOUR BOOKS' collections: Victorian Christmas Brides and Lessons on Love. Winner ACFW Genesis Award. Author of Sons of the Shenandoah Series: The Abolitionist's Daughter and The Chaplain's Daughter. 
Kathleen and her husband live in an old farmhouse in upstate NY with their children and a small zoo.


Vickie McDonough is the best-selling author of 50 books and novellas. Vickie grew up wanting to marry a rancher, but instead, she married a computer geek who is scared of horses. She now lives out her dreams penning romance stories about ranchers, cowboys, lawmen, and others living in the Old West. Vickie’s books have won numerous awards including the Booksellers Best and the Inspirational Choice awards. When she’s not writing, Vickie enjoys reading, doing stained glass projects, gardening, watching movies, and traveling. To learn more about Vickie’s books or to sign up for her newsletter, visit her website: www.vickiemcdonough.com



Jennifer Uhlarik discovered the western genre as a pre-teen when she swiped the only “horse” book she found on her older brother’s bookshelf. A new love was born. Across the next ten years, she devoured Louis L’Amour westerns and fell in love with the genre. In college at the University of Tampa, she began penning her own story of the Old West. Armed with a B.A. in writing, she has finaled and won in numerous writing competitions, and been on the ECPA best-seller list numerous times. In addition to writing, she has held jobs as a private business owner, a schoolteacher, a marketing director, and her favorite—a full-time homemaker. Jennifer is active in American Christian Fiction Writers, Women Writing the West, and is a lifetime member of the Florida Writers Association. She lives near Tampa, Florida, with her husband, college-aged son, and four fur children.
Jennifer's Social Media Links:

Direct a comment below to one or more of the authors for a chance to win her book giveaway! And don't forget to join the Mid-Month Madness Facebook party for even more great prizes!

Please be sure to include your email address in your comment using at and dot so we can notify you of your prize! Example: janedoe at gmail dot com

77 comments:

  1. Elaine Marie Cooper, what was the favorite thing you learned about the time period in the book? Kathleen Maher, what surprised you about your heroine as you developed her character?
    Congratulations to all of you on your new books!

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    1. Hi Connie. Ellen White was a lot more feisty than I thought a preacher’s Daughter would be. She had to, I guess, to handle a stubborn mule like Gideon. πŸ˜„

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    2. I loved that my research broadened my understanding of the war in New England. We generally hear about the battles in Massachusetts and even New York. But to discover the devastating attack along the coast of Connecticut that impacted so many made me realize how little we ALL know about this war. History books present a limited view. Also, it was so interesting to discover that Benedict Arnold was born and lived in CT—before he became a turncoat!

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    3. Sorry I forgot my email. bcrug(at)twc(dot)com

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  2. I don't get your email until the following day and I wasn't on face book last night so I missed the party.
    I'm reading the Cameo Courtship and just finished Jennifer's story. I've read all of Elaine's books. I'm a fan of both ladies.
    I'll ask Vickie a question. How did you research for your wagon train setting?
    I'll have to add the rest of these books to my want to read list.

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    1. Hi, Jubilee! The party is today! Hope we will see you there :)

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    2. ... and, in addition to adding the clarification that the party's today, can I also encourage you to provide your email address so we can notify you of prizes? Please see the example in Melanie's comment below yours. :)

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    3. Hope we see you later Jubilee! You haven’t missed a thing. I’ll get things kicked off at 3 Eastern with a few giveaways of my own.

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    4. Jubileewriter,

      I did another series set on the Santa Fe Trail previously--the Pioneer Promises series--so I was already familiar with it. I did online research for the things I didn't know. On the Santa Fe Historical sight, I found an interactive map, which was super helpful. I could click on a specific sight along the trail like a fort and learn more about it. If I still had questions, I do a search on the actual fort or landmark.

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  3. To all of you authors... What was your most memorable day of writing?
    mauback55 at gmail dot com

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    1. Wow, Melanie, that is a tough question. There have been many memorable moments and days. I guess one of the biggest would be that first acceptance of one of my books by a publisher. I knew I was called to write but having that confirmation was so sweet. I do love writing. Thanks for the question.

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    2. Hi Melanie. Nancy's right. That's a tough question. And, just like Nancy, I think I'd have to say the first acceptance was one of the best. Of course, seeing my first full-length novel published back on May 14 this year was amazing!

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    3. Hi Melanie. My most memorable day would be watching the livestream of ACFW’s 2012 conference when they announced my name for the Genesis Award. Poor Debbie-Lynne-Costello had to a make my acceptance speech. She is such a trooper! My husband and I wept and cheered. It was one of those moments where I felt the Lord day, see? It surely Shall come to pass... the calling to write can be terribly discouraging. But that day, I knew He was with me.

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    4. There are many memorable moments, but the one that stands out was at my first time attending Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writers Conference in 2012. I'd arrived utterly exhausted. We'd had a family emergency, a family wedding, and my military son had just deployed days before. I was very emotional, sat on a bed, and cried. I asked God why on earth I was there? He seemed to assure me I needed to trust Him. That's the conference where I pitched "Fields of the Fatherless,"to an editor who ended up publishing it. It is the best selling book of all my novels. It went on to win 3 awards and is still a great seller in the YA market.

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  4. Hello Ladies! Which of your characters did you most enjoy writing?
    psalm103and138atgmaildotcom

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    1. Hi Caryl. I have a confession. My favorite character is my bad boy Devon in The Abolitionist’s Daughter. He kept throwing me curves and taking the reins and stealing scenes. I’m delighted that he will be appearing in my work in progress. πŸ˜„

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    2. Hi Caryl,
      I think my favorite was Zola in "Zola's Cross-Country Adventure" in the MISSAdventure Brides Collection. She has spunk and determination and is out to prove that women can do anything men can. And I named her after my mom. With a name like Zola, I couldn't just give that name to anyone, so this character was special enough to give her my mom's name.

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    3. Hi Caryl, my favorite character to date has been Five Kills--the Cheyenne hero of Sand Creek Serenade. Tied for second are my heroine, Petra, from Cameo Courtships and hero Del Adler from The Mail-Order Brides Collection.

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    4. I think I really enjoyed the challenge of writing Zadok in "Love's Kindling." I constantly had to remind myself that he was blind and I had to describe his thoughts and feelings through all of his other senses.

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    5. Caryl, I think Yoana from my book, Bandolero, is one of my favorites. She was in my head for so long, wounded yet feisty, and very vocal. I loved her but needed to get her out of my head. lol

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    6. I think my favorite character is Gabriel Coulter from Gabriel's Atonement. He's a well-to-do gambler who's minding his own business when an encounter in an alley changes his life. He always had a good heart, he just didn't want anyone to know.

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  5. Hi Melanie,
    This is a toughie. I've had many, but one of my most memorable was at the second conference I ever attended. A favorite author of mine was to read a couple of my first chapters and give me feedback. During the first announcements, I learned that the author wasn't going to be there. Instead, Editor Karen Ball would be reviewing all the chapters the author had been going to. I panicked! I wanted my chapters back. I was a green, green, green very, very newbie author. I wasn't ready to meet with an editor, and certainly not one as infamous as Karen Ball. My friend sat at the lunch table reserved to have Karen at it. She said she knew I needed to talk to Karen and then promptly left. Karen sat down. NEXT TO ME! She said she had my chapters in her bag to read later and told me to make an appointment with her. My thought was "No way!" and I wondered if I could snatch my chapters out of her bag--right there on the floor between us--without her noticing. Well, I didn't resort to thievery, and I made the appointment, shaking in my shoes. Karen was super sweet and loved one of my stories. She said she almost fell off the bed laughing. And eventually published that story, which was my first published novel, NEWLYWED GAMES.

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    1. I don't know why this comment didn't go below the question, but it goes with Melanie's question above about the most memorable day in writing.

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  6. Jennifer Uhlarik, I lived near Tampa, FL for years! I also enjoy the Western genre. Which Louis L'Amour books are your favorite?
    misshoneybee (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Oooh, nice to meet another Tampa person--and another western lover! Thanks for introducing yourself. My all-time favorite L'Amour novel is Reilly's Luck. Also loved the Sackett books!

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  7. Hello ladies! My question is for all of you: what was something interesting that you learned while researching and writing your books?

    - Kailey Bechtel
    Kaileybehrendt (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Oh, there's always so much interesting stuff to learn with every book! For Taming Petra in the Cameo Courtships Collection, I had to research axes, hatchets, tomahawks, and the like. How to tell the difference between them, how to throw them, etc. Only after I finished writing the book and had long ago turned it in to the publisher did I realize that there are now places where you can go to actually DO that sort of thing! (Still haven't gone yet, but maybe sometime soon! LOL)

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    2. Hi Kailey, I’ve come across so many interesting bits of history. While researching one of my books that was set in historical Tucson, AZ, I read about a judge who loved to drive his buggy too fast. At one point he put himself on trial and ended up giving himself a fine for speeding. Talk about being honest.



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    3. One of the oddest things I’ve ever come across in research is a story out of Civil War Charleston. I think it was 1862. Apparently there had been a storm with a waterspout, which is a tornado over water, because an alligator dropped from the sky in the middle of Charleston. Hand to God. Not making this up. Lol

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    4. That’s crazy! Could you imagine what the people thought about that?!

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    5. They must have wondered what those confounded Yankees were up to now. Lol

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    6. I groaned when my editor asked me to write a proposal for a North Dakota series. I'd lived in OK all my life. What did I know about ND? So...hubby and I took a trip up there. We discovered a wonderful little town called Medora. It was started by a French Marquis who built a meat-processing plant in 1883. Until that point, only live cattle had been shipped back east to be butchered there. His plant butchered local cattle and sent the meat back east in refrigerated rail cars. His 26-room chalet is still there with many items that belonged to the family. It was fascinating to tour it. The Marquis De Mores named the town after his wife--Medora. His was a very interesting story.

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  8. A dog who went to prison for killing the mayor's wife's cat. The mayor opted to have the dog sent to prison rather than have him put down. The dog was very popular with the other inmates and soon learned his prison number and would jump on the work bus when his number was called.
    The story I have this tidbit in hasn't been contracted yet, but I'm still hopeful. =0)

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    1. That’s so interesting! I hope that can make it into a story!

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  9. I'm just dropping by to congratulate all you ladies on your new titles and wish those entering the drawing good luck! The winners are going to have some really great reading in store! I meant to join the fun but was so covered up that I missed the deadline to add my name, but hopefully I can make it next time. :-)

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    1. Thanks, Joan! Hope you'll be able to join in the next party. We missed you today.

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    2. Joan, I am SO excited about your new release and can't wait to read the whole thing!! :)

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    3. Thank you Joan. πŸ’• I loved your Revolutionary War books and need to get a copy of this, too!

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  10. Hello Ladies! Congratulations on your new releases!!

    My questions are for Jennifer Uhlarik...I am so excited for the release of Cameo Courtships! What was the inspiration for this book? How did the authors (you, Susanne Dietze, Debra E Marvin, Kathleen Y'Barbo) end up joining together to write this collection? And lastly, how did you chose/come up with the stories to weave the common theme of the cameo?

    Thanks!
    ~Alison Boss

    nj(dot)bossman(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Oh, goodness...It's been a while since this one first came about, so I'm digging deep to remember. LOL As I recall, during the summer of 2016, Susanne Dietze, Kathleen Y'Barbo and I were in another collection--Of Rags and Riches Romance Collection--together. Our publisher asked us to come up with a new title for the collection. (It was originally titled The Gilded Age Brides Collection). Susanne threw out the idea of "Cameo Courtships" and suggested adding in the element of a cameo passed through the stories. We all decided it would be too hard to reformat that collection for the cameo idea, so we parked it on the back burner and once we had some free time, started planning a whole new collection, just about a family who passes the heirloom cameo between its members. We finally got around to sending in that proposal in late 2017, and it was contracted several months into 2018.

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  11. Can't wait to read all these great books.
    To all author's here. Do you have autobiography out yet?

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    1. Thank you for stopping by. No, there's no autobiography about me. ;) It might bore readers to tears even if there was one. LOL

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    2. No but I wrote a memoir about my daughter who had a brain tumor. It's called, Bethany's Calendar.

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    3. Thank you for joining us. I don’t have an autobiography at this point.

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    4. I don't have an autobiography either. My son once told me that my life was boring. I told him I liked it that way. So that tells you what an autobiography about me would be like.

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    5. Hi! Be sure to leave us your email to be notified if you win. I have given an autobiography some thought but I really want to write about my mother, a much more remarkable woman than I.
      Thank you for your question. 😊

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    6. No. I don't think it would be a very exciting read.

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    7. Hi! You won a copy of Elaine's novel, Love's Kindling, but I have no way to reach out to you! Could you please provide your email address as per the directions? (Or PM me on my author page if that feels more secure.) Thank you!!

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  12. Mary, Nancy & Jennifer... What made you all start to want to write Historical Fiction ?
    Was there a book read as a child that inspired you ?
    Blessings
    Linda Marie Finn
    faithfulacresbooks at gmail Dot com

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    1. Hi Linda! For me, the interesting in historical fiction was two-fold. One, I came from a family of history nerds, so the love of historical facts was always of interest from an early age. And two, I fell in love with Louis L'Amour westerns when I was a pre-teen. When the writing bug bit me at age 12, I wrote the types of things I liked to read, which from early on were horse stories and western novels.

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    2. Hi Linda, My first historical was set at Fort McDowell in 1870’s Phoenix. I read an account by a Lieutenant’s wife after being stationed there. I could picture a story from her vivid descriptions and had to write the book.

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    3. Hmm. I guess I like all genres. I've written stories set in the past, present, and future. Even a time travel and some fantasy. Not all of those have been published. The more research I do for historicals, the more interesting stuff I find in history. Some of it is hysterical. I didn't like boring, dry history in school, but LOVE it now!

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  13. Mary Davis, I have read some of your books about Mackinac Island and enjoyed them. Did you travel there to research your books? Brenda W lemonade050 (at) hotmail dot [com]

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    1. Hi Brenda,
      I'm glad you enjoyed my Mackinac Island stories. I LOVE Mackinac! I have been there several times. My husband is from Michigan and went there every summer as a kid. I haven't been nearly as many times, but I"d love to try to catch up. So what better excuse than research to visit again, on a "research" trip. When I was there, I took notes of things I could use in future stories. I have a historical Mackinac Island series I would love to get published. Maybe some day.

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  14. Ok, First I want to thank you ladies for your time and kind hearts. As they say, you can tell a book by it’s cover, well your books say a lot about the person you are. I love all the books and there settings and time periods.
    Now for all of you, what was your favorite book as a child and did it have anything to do with you becoming a writer?
    Blessings to all

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    1. Being dyslexic, reading was hard for me and literally gave me headaches. I did love the Meg Mysteries and learned to love reading as an adult. Late bloomer. I've always had characters roaming around in my head. I wrote (and illustrated--Yikes!) a children's story for my husband shortly after we were married. My mom said, "You should get this published!" I never got that book published, but it got me thinking, and I eventually switched to writing romance and love it!

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    2. Hi Kathy. So glad you could join us today! I had many favorite books as a child, but probably my favorite on that helped to launch me on my writing journey was The Black Stallion. I remember reading that book in one sitting on a cold, wintry day in Wisconsin, and afterwards, I wandered around the chilly house feeling like I'd been on a vacation to somewhere wonderful and warm. It was later on, after getting hooked on that book (and just about any other book about horses) that I discovered western novels. That's what I write today! ;)

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    3. One of my favorite books as a child was Jane Eyre and I still love the story to this day. Not certain if it impacted me becoming a writer but I remember the authors vivid descriptions so clearly. Perhaps it helped me to try to paint pictures for my readers. :)

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    4. Hi Kathy. My first book obsession was The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter. I adored that rabbit’s courage to go out into the world after losing his father. As a preschooler, I found courage in his example to face the scary world without my father, too.

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    5. As a kid, I had a passion for horses. I read every book I could find with a horse on the cover. I really liked the Misty of Chincoteaque books, as well as The Black Stallion series.

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  15. Congratulations to all on your new releases. Just to say I enjoyed the short time I was able to drop in this afternoon on your Facebook party. Thank you tor taking of your time to talk about your novels.

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    1. Pat, Thank you for stopping by and joining in!

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    2. We were glad you were able to drop in, even for a brief time, Pat! Thanks for stopping by.

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    3. Thank you Pat! I’m blessed that you joined us.

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  16. Cameo courtships...how do you come up with an idea for apology and how do you get other authors to. participate?

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    1. Hi Rory. Thanks for the great question. Typically, one author brainstorms a fun theme--whether it be "mail-order brides" or "Oregon Trail" or "Cowboys" or whatever, and once she has that idea fairly firmed up, then she starts asking other authors to participate. Once she has commitments from the other authors, then we all talk amongst ourselves and make sure we don't write stories that are too similar to others in the collection, don't duplicate names of characters, etc. And once we have come up with our stories, we compile the ideas into a proposal and submit it to the publisher. After that, it's a waiting/praying game until we get an answer back on whether they want to contract it or not.

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  17. Mary Davis how lo g have you been writing? Where do your ideas for a book come from?

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    1. Hi Rory,
      I have been writing seriously since 1989. I took correspondence writing courses and started submitting my work to publishers.
      Where do my ideas come from? Where don't they come from would be a shorter list. Let's see . . .
      Other books-I might say to myself, "I want to write a mail-order bride story." And I did.
      Movies
      Movie trailers
      TV
      The guy walking across the street in front of my car at the stop light
      An editor or agent asking if I'd ever thought about writing about ____?
      My in-laws' cottage
      Something one of my children said
      Some tidbit of research
      An off-hand comment
      An animal
      A pet
      A picture
      A memory
      Things my children have done
      and a lot of what-ifs
      This list could go on and on. I never seem to be at a loss for story ideas. I could write none stop for the rest of my life and not run out ideas.

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  18. Vicki Mcdonough..do you enjoy writing books that are a series with other authors? Or do.you prefer to write your own series?

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    1. I enjoy both. I first got published by writing a collection with other authors, so those are dear to my heart. Writing your own series is special but also very challenging, and it takes a couple of years. I remember being scared to death after I signed my first contract for own series. Even now, the thought of writing another one is a bit daunting. It's a big commitment, but so rewarding once it's done.

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  19. Hello I am Danielle from southern Minnesota. My email is candace84032003@yahoo.com and I have a question for each of you authors. What is your long time dream to come from your writing?

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    1. Hi Danielle. Nice to meet you! My longtime dream would be to help my husband financially through my writing. He’s been an unbelievable supporter through my very long journey and I just want to bless his patience to allow me all these years to pursue my dreams.

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    2. I've always wanted my writing to glorify God and point people toward Him! With a learning disability, I know this writing thing isn't coming from me. Without the Lord, I couldn't write.
      Also, writing helps keep the crazy in my brain down. There are all these people running around in my head clamoring to be heard. =0)

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    3. I have a lot of dreams for my writing. Some have come true (getting the first contract, then getting multiple contracts, winning awards for my stories) and others yet to come true (making a decent living from my writing, seeing a story I wrote turned into a movie).

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  20. I raised four sons, and reading was my "me" time. I began writing as a ministry to haggard women who needed to escape for a time in a good story. I always pray that God will see that my books get into the hands of the people who need to read them. The one dream I have that hasn't yet come true is to see one of my books made into a movie.

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  21. Hi! I have the privilege of announcing our winners here on the blog! :D
    Melanie Backus won The Chaplain's Daughter
    Caryl Kane won The Daughter's Predicament
    Melissa M won Sand Creek Serenade
    Danielle won Bandolero
    Rory won Julia
    Thanks so much to all who participated!!
    Blesssings, Linda

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