Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Old West Manners + Book Giveaway!

By Tiffany Amber Stockton



Last month, I shared about the "iconic timepiece." If you missed that post, you can read it here: http://www.hhhistory.com/2017/07/the-iconic-timepiece.html.

* * * * * * * * * *

In July, I celebrated not one, but TWO new book releases. So, I'm going to do a drawing of TWO winners from the comments on today's post, and you'll have your choice of an autographed copy of either book. Covers and summaries are at the bottom of this post.

* * * * * * * * * *

Time is always passing, and it's always required when attempting to accomplish something. For instance, drilling manners into my children requires fortitude and a grand abundance of time to knock this kind of sense into them. *grins* It IS encouraging, though, when I hear the "please" or "thank you" or the very rare "yes, ma'am" or yes, sir" even though I answer them with those all the time. I thought it might be fun to share some rules from days gone by. Perhaps we'll realize how good we have it today.

OLD WEST MANNERS

WELLS FARGO RULES FOR RIDING THE STAGECOACH

Adherence to the Following Rules Will Insure a Pleasant Trip for All


  • Abstinence from liquor is requested, but if you must drink, share the bottle. To do otherwise makes you appear selfish and un-neighborly.
  • If ladies are present, gentlemen are urged to forego smoking cigars and pipes as the odor of same is repugnant to the Gentle Sex. Chewing tobacco is permitted, but spit WITH the wind, not against it.
  • Gentlemen must refrain from the use of rough language in the presence of ladies and children.
  • Buffalo robes are provided for your comfort during cold weather. Hogging robes will not be tolerated and the offender will be made to ride with the driver.
  • Don't snore loudly while sleeping or use your fellow passenger's shoulder for a pillow; he or she may not understand and friction may result.
  • Firearms may be kept on your person for use in emergencies. Do not fire them for pleasure or shoot at wild animals as the sound riles the horses.
  • In the event of runaway horses, remain calm. Leaping from the coach in panic will leave you injured, at the mercy of the elements, hostile Indians and hungry wolves.
  • Forbidden topics of discussion are stagecoach robberies and Indian uprisings.
  • Gents guilty of unchivalrous behavior toward lady passengers will be put off the stage. It's a long walk back. A word to the wise is sufficient.

Cowboy Hat Etiquette


  • Remove hat when eating.
  • Removed when the national anthem is played. Hold your hat in your right hand, over your heart. This applies to women, unless their hat is held on with hat pins.
  • Cowboys tip their hats to ladies when out doors, remove them when being introduced, and remove them when entering a ladies home.
  • Men never tipped their hats to other men in the Old West. It was akin to calling them a woman. A nod was a common greeting when not shaking hands.
  • In commercial or public buildings it's not necessary to remove your hat - but should be when entering a private office. It is generally considered polite to remove it in a private home, unless other people are wearing their hats.
  • Wearing a hat to a theatre is fine but should be removed if it blocks anyone's view of the entertainment.

Chuckwagon Etiquette


  • No one eats until Cookie calls
  • When Cookie calls, everyone comes a runnin'
  • Hungry cowboys wait for no man. They fill their plates, fill their bellies, and then move on so stragglers can fill their plates.
  • Cowboys eat first, talk later.
  • It's okay to eat with your fingers. The food is clean.
  • If you're refilling the coffee cup and someone yells "Man at the pot." You're obliged to serve refills.
  • Don't take the last serving unless your sure you're the last man.
  • Food left on the plate is an insult to the cook.
  • No running or saddling a horse near the wagon. And when you ride off, always ride down wind from the wagon.
  • If you come across any decent firewood, bring it back to the wagon.
  • Strangers are always welcome at the wagon.


NOW IT'S YOUR TURN:

* What is one example of manners drilled into you from a young age? Did it stick?

* Which rule(s) above do you wish were still commonplace today? Why?

* Which rule above did you find the most humorous?

* What is 1 fascinating fact about today's post which caught your eye today?

GIVEAWAY


Leave answers to the questions or any feedback on the post in the comments below to be entered into the drawing. Please also include your email address (email [at] domain [dot] com, net, us, etc.)

Comments with "please enter me" will not be qualified.

The winners will be announced on this blog and contacted privately by the 18th of August.

Don't forget to come back on the 9th of September for my next appearance.


The Second Chance Brides Collection: Nine Historical Romances Offer New Hope for Love

From a Distance (novella #8)
Trevor Fox is on a quest to get away for a while from his job as financial adviser of his father’s company in New York. Working at a horse ranch just outside of Breckenridge, Colorado, affords him anonymity and solitude—until his fellow ranch workers decide to play a joke on him which blows out of proportion and names him as the most eligible bachelor in town. Distraught at the endless line of ladies all of a sudden vying for his attention and risking his true identity being revealed, Trevor seeks out an average girl showing no interest in him and decides to pursue her affections. Anna St. Claire always lived life in the shadow of her older, and more beautiful, sister. So she let her sister accept all the offers and didn’t give them a second glance…except for one, and he didn’t even know she existed. After taking her inheritance and moving to Breckenridge, she is shocked when Trevor walks into her life again and makes her an offer she can’t refuse. She pretends to live like an average girl in an attempt to sway Trevor’s affections. Her plan backfires, though, when he discovers her ruse, and she faces the possibility of losing him all over again.

Magic of the Swan: A historical retelling of a classic fairy tale (Love Everlasting Book 6)

Elenora Caldwell and Trevor Davenport had been thrown together since they were children. As the years passed, a deep friendship developed. Now, as heirs to their respective family fortunes, they each attempt to find where they fit into life’s grand puzzle. When Elenora’s father dismisses a man from his employ, the man threatens to seek revenge. Charmed and fascinated by a new magician in the city who studied under the Great Houdini, Elenora sneaks out to attend a performance, but ends up a pawn in a vile scheme by the magician to take control of Caldwell Enterprises. In order to save Elenora, Trevor must first defeat Cravatta. How can he match wits with a master illusionist? And could his reunion with Elenora be the key to a brand new life?

** I only recently realized both heroes are named "Trevor." Guess I must like that name. This is also what happens when you're working on more than one book at a time, and more than a year passes between finished novels and more recent ones. **


BIO

Tiffany Amber Stockton has been crafting and embellishing stories since childhood, when she was accused of having a very active imagination and cited with talking entirely too much. Today, she has honed those childhood skills to become an author and speaker who works in the anti-aging, health & wellness, and personal development industry, helping others become their best from the inside out.

She lives with her husband and fellow author, Stuart Vaughn Stockton, in Colorado. They have one girl and one boy, and a Retriever mix named Roxie. She has sold twenty (21) books so far and is represented by Tamela Hancock Murray of the Steve Laube Agency. You can also find her on FacebookTwitterPinterest, and LinkedIn.

32 comments:

  1. 1) My parents did not drill manners into me, they were polite, mannered people so I was.
    2) Yes, removing hats when eating, indoors, etc. I can't stand it when a man keeps his hat on, it just irks me.
    3) Most humorous: "Don't snore loudly while sleeping or use your fellow passenger's shoulder for a pillow". :)
    4) All of it caught my eye, loved reading about etiquette, wish the people of today had it and used it, it might be a better world.

    jslbrown2009 at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true, Lisa. Etiquette seems to have gone the way of the dinosaur in a lot of instances. Very sad. :(

      Delete
  2. Thank you for the great post. The thing drilled into us was to never talk with your mouth full and always chew gum with your mouth closed. I still adhere to that rule today. As for the post I found the most funny...the stagecoach rules, some of those could apply to when you fly in an airplane. :) The one I wish was still followed today is Cowboy Hat Etiquette, but for all hats. The one fact that really caught my eye was, "No running or saddling a horse near the wagon. And when you ride off, always ride down wind from the wagon." I guess they didn't want the eating area to smell like the horses.

    Blessings,
    Cindy W.
    countrybear52 AT yahoo DOT com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol! I hadn't thought about the connection between the stagecoach and the airplane. You're absolutely right. As for the downwind rule, it's either the smell or perhaps even dirt and dust being kicked up and possibly entering the eating area. No one wants dirt particles in their food. :)

      Delete
  3. "Keep your elbows off the table" is one that has always stuck with me!

    I wish "Gentlemen must refrain from the use of rough language in the presence of ladies and children" was still commonplace, especially when an old man in a motorized shopping cart ran into my husband at Walmart then cussed him out in front of my two young daughters >:(

    I think "It's okay to eat with your fingers. The food is clean" is hilarious!!!

    This one surprised me: "Men never tipped their hats to other men in the Old West. It was akin to calling them a woman."

    Thanks for the fun post and giveaway!

    colorvibrant at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, the foul language rule. YES!! I hate having to shield my children's ears in public, and I especially am annoyed when that language is used in my presence. I always make it a point to ask the person to watch their mouth around me.

      Delete
  4. I appreciate all the rules that denoted respect for a woman. Sometimes I think modern women don't realize what an honor it is to be respected for their gender. I too liked "It's ok to eat with your fingers", and "When Cookie calls, come a'runnin'". Thanks for the great post.
    bcrug(at)myfairpoint(dot)net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes. This whole "women's lib" movement actually HURT women more than it helped. Women don't understand what kind of value there is in respect, and because they have wanted to take control, they have forced men to be lazy in respect and the concept is all but lost. I make it a point always to acknowledge and thank any man who still shows respect, even in a small way, so they know how much it's appreciated.

      Delete
  5. Our parents led my example for wonderful manners at home and in public.

    Men should always remove their hats. I've seen security personnel insist this be done inside of a courthouse. I agree rough talk among women should be refrained from. Thankfully a lot of places allow no smoking inside the building or even on their campus even at hospitals.

    "Don't snore loudly while sleeping or use your fellow passenger's shoulder for a pillow; he or she may not understand and friction may result." I found this one to be hilarious along with "It's okay to eat with your fingers. The food is clean."

    1. This one is a surprise but if abstience is requested but then saying if you drank share the drink. Double meaning to this: "Abstinence from liquor is requested, but if you must drink, share the bottle. To do otherwise makes you appear selfish and un-neighbor."

    Wonderful informative post with some chuckles. Thank you and thank you for the giveaway. I've seen so many positive remarks about both of these books.
    marilynridgway78 [at] gmail[dot] com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hehe. That snoring one and using a shoulder for a pillow could apply to airplane etiquette today. :)

      Delete
  6. I don't remember much about my childhood, but my mother did teach me manners especially to be thankful. I think men should be removing their hats when inside or at the table. So many still wear their ball caps all the time. The most humorous rule, "It's okay to eat with your fingers. The food is clean." Fascinating fact, "Gentlemen must refrain from the use of rough language in the presence of ladies and children."

    princessdebbie1_2000(at)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That eating with the fingers because the food is clean has caught a lot of readers. :) The hat removal thing irks me when men don't do it. I wish it was taught as commonplace today.

      Delete
  7. This was funny: Abstinence from liquor is requested, but if you must drink, share the bottle. To do otherwise makes you appear selfish and un-neighborly.

    Not the same, but I teach pre-K Sunday School and the rule is if you bring snacks, candy or gum (unopened of course), you have to share with the others. Otherwise keep it in your pocket or leave it with mom/dad/grandma. lol

    This was great. Some of it is familiar to me, but I learned some new stuff. I KNOW in my head that cowboys didn't tip their hat to other cowboys, but I wasn't sure if it was just my own thoughts or if it was an actual rule. Now I know. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent rule in your pre-K class. Share it or leave it with parent/grandparent. I love it! Glad to help you confirm some rules. :)

      Delete
  8. 1)All kinds of manners were drilled into us 5 kids. But the one that really stuck out
    to me was the use of "Yes/No Mam and Yes/No Sir" My kids today use it also.

    2) Yes/No Mam and Yes/No Sir and Removal of hats with men and boys. It shows respect
    to the lady in question.

    3) If your refilling your coffee cup and someone yells "Man at the Pot".....

    4) Todays post - how respect was just expected back then period.

    quilting dash lady at Comcast dot net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Man at the Pot" Lol! That could mean something completely different today. :)

      Delete
  9. One lesson we learned was not to talk with our mouth full. My stepfather was a stickler about it. Ten we met our new grandparents. They grossed out us kids at the dinner table. Ewwwww! fishing(jan(at) aol(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no! To have your grandparents be the ones to break the rules in front of the grandkids. Whoops! Lol!

      Delete
  10. As always, a very interesting and education article! I think the most basic of manners, and something my parents always expected and stressed, are the simple please and thank you for all interactions. I thought the man at the pot was funny but really made logistical sense. I also like the one about obnoxious to women "gentlemen" would be put off the stage. I wish more people realized that others don't care to hear their obnoxious language. Thanks! dixiedobie at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops....typo....educational article.

      Delete
    2. Simple please and thank you's. They go a long way when they're used. And refraining from obnoxious language. I wish people would realize it's just an indication of being lazy in language. That's one thing drilled into me even today. The English language is robust with a plethora of words to be utilized. Explore the many nuances of the beautiful language and don't be lazy by picking the more commonly used ones.

      Delete
  11. I really enjoyed this post about Old West etiquette. I wish the one about rough language in front of women and children was still in force today. Unfortunately, a lot of the rough language today comes from women.
    This was a fun post. Thank you for sharing.
    susanmsj at msn dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my goodness, Susan, you're absolutely right. When I hear men use foul language in front of women, it irritates me, but when women and children are using it, I'm deeply saddened.

      Delete
  12. I love this fun post on manners of the Old West! There are several rules of etiquette I wish were still observed today!

    texaggs2000 at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That seems to be the common desire. It's sad to see how much etiquette is not observed these days.

      Delete
  13. Fun post, Amber. Thanks for sharing. :)
    I have a strange hobby of studying etiquette from different periods and places, so this was interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fascinating how it changes from location to location and year to year, isn't it?

      Delete
  14. --Gents guilty of unchivalrous behavior toward lady passengers will be put off the stage. It's a long walk back. A word to the wise is sufficient.

    I'm sure this rule didn't always keep the men from flirting with a pretty lady!

    --Abstinence from liquor is requested, but if you must drink, share the bottle. To do otherwise makes you appear selfish and un-neighborly.

    No thanks!

    Many of them seem quite humorous or un-necessary to us today, but times certainly are different.

    pattymh2000(at)yahoo(dot)com


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Flirting is far different from being unchivalrous. :) And sharing the bottle? I've done that with friends, but not with strangers.

      Delete
  15. "Don't take with your mouth full" has stuck with me.

    I wish "Gentlemen must refrain from the use of rough language in the presence of ladies and children." I cringe when I hear this type of language.

    "It's okay to eat with your fingers. The food is clean." Too funny!

    I was surprised by - "Wearing a hat to a theatre is fine but should be removed if it blocks anyone's view of the entertainment."

    Thank you for the fun post and giveaway.
    psalm103and138 at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep. It's all about being aware of those around you and not getting in their way. That's probably a big one that was drilled into me growing up. Spacial awareness and acknowledgement of how your actions and behaviors are affecting others around you. Seems almost lost in today's society. Far too many only care about themselves. :(

      Delete
  16. I enjoyed reading about the cowboy etiquette. I've read plenty of westerns and books about the 1800's and haven't heard some of these like If you're refilling the coffee cup and someone yells "Man at the pot." You're obliged to serve refills and Gents guilty of unchivalrous behavior toward lady passengers will be put off the stage. It's a long walk back. A word to the wise is sufficient. Makes sense to me. We all need to show we care about others instead of just ourselves. Congratulations on your new book releases. And the name Trevor? It's a great name, I don't blame you for using it twice.
    Deanne Cnnamongirl at aol dot com

    ReplyDelete